Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Peter Long (1755 - 1827)

At the age of  20  John Peter Long entered into the militia to fight in the war for  Independence.  He enrolled as an Associator in the Bucks County Militia on August 10, 1775.  He took the Oath of Allegiance before John Davis, Esq. and saw several months of service in the Ninth Pennsylvania Continental Line under Captain John Davis.

Reference is found that he also served in Captain Nicholas Patterson’s company, Tinicum Township, May 22, 1780. As a single man he was available to serve when the call for action was given. His duties would have primarily involved securing the home front from invasion by hostiles.

Johann "John" Peter Long was a son of Ludwick Long and Mary Elizabeth Scholl. He married Elizabeth Worman of Tinicum Township, Bucks County on Feburary 15, 1780 in Tohickon township, Bucks Co.   Her parents were Michael and Catherine Worman.  Micheal Worman also served in the Revolutionary War.   The marriage of Peter and Elizabeth Long  produced eight children.   Their names and spouses listed in the Sons of American Revolution application were: Catherine, born July 24, 178, married Conrad Snyder; John L., born 1783, married Catherine Hunsberger; John Ludwig, born April 27, 1785, unmarried; Sarah Elizabeth, born  February 2, 1787, died in infancy; Mary, born December 10, 1788,  married John Nicholas; Susannah, born January 24, 1791, married Christian Trauger and Peter, born Jan. 25, 1795, married Catherine Rufe.

Some existing tax records are helpful to establish that Peter owned property in Bucks County.  The Tinicum Twp. Tax Lists for 1779 shows that Peter Long is taxed as "young man" before his marriage in 1780.  In 1781 the record shows that  Peter Long owned 2 horses and 2 cattle.  Again in 1782 the record shows that Peter still had those two horses and 2 head of cattle.  The 1787 record shows that he was  taxed 10 shillings.   Shull comments, "About 1800  he located in Durham twp., Bucks Co., PA, along the Durham Road, near Rufe's Schoolhouse, on the farm later occupied by Richard Kintner.  They were members of St. Luke's Lutheran Church.  Peter served as Elder and was on the committee to erect the Nockamixon Union church in 1812.  He was a man of Excellent character,  noted for his honesty and good sense.  He possessed a good common school education and conversed both in German and in English.  He was held in high esteem by all who knew him."

John Peter and Elizabeth Long were members of St. Luke's Lutheran Church, Nockamixon during the pastorate of Rev. John Conrad Yeager.  In 1978,   I located the graves of  Peter and Elizabeth Long in the Nockamixon Cemetery, Bucks Co., PA.  Their birth and death dates are recorded on the stone.  He lived to be 72 years old. Elizabeth was born November 15, 1762 and died July 18, 1828.  She lived to the age of 65.

Their son Peter who married Catherine Rufe had a son Mahlon who married Sarah Hoover. They were the parents of  Howard Herbert Long who married Ella May Heffner  and became the parents of Eliza Long McEwen, my grandmother.

Sources:
  • National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, https://www.sar.org, # 41124
  • Daughters of the American Revolution, http://www.dar.org, Ancestor #: A071314
  • PA Archives, Fifth Series, Vol. V page 348 - 358, Vol. VIII  pages 71 - 77 - 395 - 404
  • http://www.findagrave.com.  # 54825199 and  # 60839615 
  • Humphrey, John T., Pennsylvania Births, Bucks County, Gateway Press, Baltimore, MD 21202
  • Northampton County families : genealogical notes ,  Horatio Gates Shull, Easton, Pa. : The Author, 1930
  • Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Tax and Exoneration, 1768-1801 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
                                                                Copyright
This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith

Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.

GENEALOGY IS A WORK OF HEART
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. It is with pleasure that I am able to present this information here for you to see. If you discover a relationship here, I would very much enjoy hearing from you.    

Monday, November 30, 2015

Elias Shull (1755-1838)

Elias Shull was a member of  various militia companies during the Revolution.   The DAR has a record for him as Ancestor #: A100951.  There is also a Sons of the American Revolution record, Membership:62393. He was a private in the company of  Capt. Shoop or Shupe, Nockamixon Twp., Bucks Co., Pa, in 1781 when he took part in the Battle of Trenton, NJ.  He also served as a private in the company of Capt. Manus Yost, of Haycock Township, Bucks Co., Pa. Militia,  1781.


It was known that he was  in service with the Bucks Co. militia at one of the lower points  on the Delaware, at the time of the taking of Trenton, by General  Washington, on Christmas night, 1776. However, there are no  existing muster rolls to show this service.


It is also well documented from accounts given by Elias  personally to persons who knew him that he was at the Battle of Crooked Billet on May 1, 1778,  a surprise attack staged by  a detachment of British Loyalists from Philadelphia, against several militia companies from Bucks and Cumberland Counties,  commanded by General John Lacey.  The Americans suffered heavy loses.

Elias owned farms at various times both in Tinicum and Buckingham Twps. in Bucks Co., Pa.  In 1800, after the Revolutionary War, he decided to sell his land and migrate to Ontario, Canada, where many families of his neighborhood had already located.  Having sold his lands, Elias loaded up and started the long journey,  but when he reached Easton he heard reports of serious Indian outbreaks.  This gave him pause for thought and upon  reconsideration  he abandoned the plan and instead  bought land in Lower Mt. Bethel.  Here he remained the rest of his life.  He engaged in  farming, opperated a tavern, and was the first carpenter and joiner in Lower Mt. Bethel.  It was said that during his life he made at least five hundred coffins.  At his death he was the largest land owner in Lower Mt. Bethel Twp.

Elias was born in L. Milford Twp., Bucks Co., Pennsylvania on February 3, 1755, and died in L. Mt. Bethel Twp., Northampton Co., Pennsylvania on May 3,1838.  His first wife was Catherine Kruger, daughter of Nicholas and Charity Kruger, Jr.  Catherine died following the birth of Peter on March 6, 1793. She was also the mother of Anna Catherine, born July18, 1781; Philip, born July 2, 1784; Elias, born November 27, 1786; and Maria Sarah, born October 9, 1789.  With a big family like that and an infant who needed tending to Elias  immediately married the widow of John Schuman, Charity Gertrant Kruger Schuman.   She who was the daughter of Nicholas Kruger, Sr.,  which meant that Elias married the half aunt of his first wife!   And he wasted no time producing a couple of more children.  Elias and Charity were the parents of Elizabeth, born April 23, 1794, and Mary, born June 18, 1796. The second Mrs Scholl, died on August 14, 1839 and is buried with Elias at Three Church Hill Cemetery in Lower Mt. Bethel.


FindAGrave Memorial# 145933679
FindAGrave Memorial #146333838
His grave is marked with and American flag to pay homage to his service in the Revolutionary War. The family tree of Lillie Mae Deats Good, the great grandmother of Ron Smith, is ripe with veterans of the Revolutionary War.  She is the great, great granddaughter of  Elias Shull,  John Deats, James RossJoseph Fox and the Third great granddaughter of Thomas Ross.  I wonder how often the family took time to remember the service of these men and the legacy that they left us.

Sources:
  • Humphrey, John T., Pennsylvania Births, Bucks County, Gateway Press, Baltimore, MD 21202
  • Records of Keller's Lutheran Church, Bedminster Twp., Bucks Co., Pa, 1751-1798
  • Scholl, Sholl, Shull Genealogy: The Colonial Branches, John William Scholl, 1930 
  • http://www.findagrave.com. Photo taken by Carol A. Hoff
  • National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, https://www.sar.org
  • Daughters of the American Revolution, http://www.dar.org
  • William J. Heller, History of Northampton County (Pennsylvania) and the Grand Valley of the Lehigh. New York: American Historical Society, 1920.
  • PA Archives, Third Series, Vol. VI  page 135
                                                                    Copyright
This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith

Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.

GENEALOGY IS A WORK OF HEART
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. It is with pleasure that I am able to present this information here for you to see. If you discover a relationship here, I would very much enjoy hearing from you.            

Thursday, November 26, 2015

My Mayflower Connections

What would Thanksgiving be if we didn't take time to remember the Pilgrims who hopped aboard that little sailing ship in 1620 to venture across the sea and take up residence at Plymouth Rock?  On this Thanksgiving Day,  I want to recognize 5 of those who were on the Mayflower and from whom I have direct lines of descent.

"The Rescue of John Howland 


My grandmother Zilpha Estep Hughes was extremely proud to be descended from John Howland.  He was a single young man about the age of 21, traveling as the servant to Governor John Carver.  During the Mayflower's voyage, John fell overboard during a storm, and was almost lost at sea, but lucky for him, he was able to grab hold of the topsail halyards and others yanked him back aboard with a boat-hook. Glad you were a strong swimmer and got back on that ship John, because after all these years I can say, I owe my life to you!

But I won't stop there with debts of gratitude to those adventurous Pilgrims.  There was a wee girl by the name of Elizabeth Tilly on board also.  She was about 13 or so years old and traveled with her parents John and Joan Tilley.  Unfortunately John and Joan were among those  who died the first winter at Plymouth.  That left 13-year old daughter Elizabeth an orphan! Imagine that!  Striking out to an unknown place and then your parents die all too soon!

"The First Thanksgiving" (1915), by Jean Louis Gerome Ferris
John Howland and Elizabeth Tilly married and raised a family of 10 children, Desire, John, Hope, Elizabeth, Lydia, Hannah, Joseph, Jabez, Ruth, and Isaac.  Their daughter Hope married John Chipman about 1647 and had twelve children.  Then we get a whole lot of begats and begottens  until it comes down the line to Sarah Angeline  Chauncey Scott, my great great grandmother.  Awesome!

Elizabeth Tilly Howland lived to the age of 80, a  long life in the New World.  John lived to be about the age of 72.  They must have been folks of strong constitution to survive the voyage to the New World, that harsh first winter and the hardships of  building a life in a foreign land.

Now there is one more  Mayflower passenger I owe a bit of homage to.  That would be George Soule. Like John Howland, George also traveled on the Mayflower as a servant. He, to Edward Winslow and family.  George distinguished himself in the town of Duxbury,  building the community and serving on various committees; of note the committee formed to address the problem of  smoking tobacco. A line of descent from him transpired through the Ayers family who  finally reached Lower Mount Bethel twp. in Northampton Co., Pa. where Jane Ayers married Henry Rasley. They were the great grand parents of my mother, Lois McEwen Hughes. George Soule also enjoyed a long life living in the New World.  He died at the age of 80.

Edward Tilly, John Howland and George Soule all signed the Mayflower Compact.  Happy Thanksgiving to these Pilgrims!

Sources:
  •  http://mayflowerhistory.com, 1994-2015, MayflowerHistory.com
  • Pilgrim Overboard—The Rescue of John Howland , painting by Mike Haywood
  • Saints and Strangers, George F. Willison, Reynal and Hitchcock, New York, 1945
  • Family records of Cynthia Hughes Smith

                                                      Copyright

This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith

Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.

GENEALOGY IS A WORK OF HEART
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. It is with pleasure that I am able to present this information here for you to see. If you discover a relationship here, I would very much enjoy hearing from you.

Friday, November 13, 2015

James Estep (1818-1901) Immigrant from Wales

James Estep, with determination and fortitude, at the age of 40, decided to bring his young family to the United States of America in 1858. They came to share in the prosperity living here would bring to them.  The Estep family represents the most recent immigrant ancestors in our family tree.  James and Elizabeth, together with their children and others set sail from Cardiff, Wales.   Ten years after arriving  James filed his Declaration of Intent for citizenship in the United States of America.

I have searched for a ships record that would document their passage, but have not been able to find one (if someone knows of such, please let me know).  Therefore, I have to rely on the oral history passed down via my grandmother, Zilpha Estep, who was the daughter of Charles, son of James and Elizabeth Estep.  The story is told that it was an arduous journey of six weeks, lasting far longer than the three weeks they had expected due to bad weather.  While rations had been provided by the shipping company for the normal length of travel, James had to use his reserved funds to buy food for his family during the extra days at sea.  There were 6 children: Sarah, who was about 10 years old;  Lewis, who would have been about 8; Ann and John who were about 5; William, about 3 years old and the baby, James II, born in 1857.  They were a lot of mouths to feed and preparing meals for   the family fell to Elizabeth.  Passengers in steerage were expected to prepare meals their own meals with the food provided which included bread, biscuits, potatoes and water.

When their ship finally landed in Philadelphia it was necessary for them to travel to Bloomsburg where they were to connect with friends and family already settled there.  Not having enough money left to purchase tickets for everyone,  the men put their wives and children on board the train for Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania while they set out to walk the distance from Philadelphia to Bloomsburg.  It is said that Elizabeth Pritchard Estep had family in the Bloomsburg area.  James and his family lived in the Bloomsburg area until 1869, during which time he worker as a coal miner.

Several more children were born during the time  James and Elizabeth lived in Bloomsburg.  David was born March 2, 1859, Rebecca in 1861, George in 1863, Charles in 1865 and Elizabeth in April of 1867.  Before they left Bloomsburg, James had filed his Declaration of Intent for citizenship in the United States of America on September 7, 1868 at the Columbia County Courthouse in Bloomsburg.

The family left the Bloomsburg area in 1869 to move to Covert, Pennsylvania, an area also known as Armenia Mountain, outside of Troy, Pennsylvania in Bradford County.  James and his sons were all working in the coal mines now, but James also was able to buy land and operate a farm.  It wasn't until August 8, 1872 that James was finally granted his citizenship papers in the Court of Common Pleas in Tioga Co., PA.

One more child came to be a part of the family through adoption. She was Martha, born in 1878 and listed on the Census record in 1880. That is little Martha in this picture with James and Elizabeth and daughter Elizabeth.  Since Lizzie got married in 1888 and Martha looks to be about 6,  I would say this picture was taken around 1884.

James Estep was born in Wales on May 5, 1818. His wife Elizabeth Pritchard  was born, August 16,1822, also in Wales.  They were married November 2,  1845, in Llanover (Llanvoyer) Breconshire, Wales.  He was an Iron Ore Miner in the County of Breconshire, Wales.  James and Elizabeth Estep are now buried in Arbon Cemetery in Blossburg.  In October of 1993,  Lucille Henderson told me that the graves had been moved from the cemetery at Covert where they were first interred to the Arbon Cemetery so that perpetual care could be provided.

The Wellsboro Agitator, Aug. 21, 1901
The tombstone gives these dates.
James Estep
May 12, 1818 - Aug. 3, 1901
Elizabeth, his wife
Aug. 10, 1826 - ( no death date engraved )
It should be noted that there are several discrepancies concerning the birth and death dates of these two ancestors.

I want express my gratitude to so many people who helped me research the Estep family.  I have compiled this narrative from notes written by my grandmother, Zilpha Estep Hughes Lawrence, and from interviews with her sisters, Angie Estep Loomis and Wilma Jane Estep Ferris, granddaughters of James and Elizabeth Estep. Lucille Loomis Henderson, the first born great-granddaughter of James and Elizabeth Estep, was of invaluable assistance. Also contributing a great deal information on the James Estep I family was Roy Estep on Mansfield, Pennsylvania.  They all loved history and genealogy, but most of all they loved to share their information with me.  It was a joy to have known them all.

Don't forget to follow the links on this page to other posts about members of the Estep Family.

                                                          Copyright
This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith

Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.

GENEALOGY IS A WORK OF HEART
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. It is with pleasure that I am able to present this information here for you to see. If you discover a relationship here, I would very much enjoy hearing from you.


Friday, October 30, 2015

Van Wey Homestead rendering, circa 1850

This picture card was part of a collection of family memorabilia belonging to my father, Richard L. Hughes, Jr.   The letter on the reverse side was written to my great grandfather, Simeon Hughes of Tioga, Pennsylvania.  My mother made the note at the top of the letter on the reverse side that she thought it was a rendition of the Hughes homestead. That is mother's handwriting.  But alas, dear Mother, you were wrong about that.  A little internet sleuthing found information about the author of the letter, poem and drawing  Louis E. Cooke,  and I discovered he was quite the fellow in his day. 
Here are the Clues:
1. In the poem he talks about experiencing travels far and wide.
2. The title gives his birth date, May 17, 1850 and says "The place where I was born".
3. In the letter he asks Sim if he remembers the old log house implying a shared relationship.
Fact:
1. Louis E. Cooke is not a  son of Frederick Hughes nor a grandson of Jeptha, as none of Jeptha's daughters married a Cooke.
Assumptions:
1. He could have been related to Fred's wife Harriet Van Wey.  Her obituary states that she lived and died in the same location, which was Jackson township, Tioga Co. PA
2. If Louis E. Cooke is a relative of Harriet Van Wey Hughes, than this drawing may be the  Homestead of her parents Henry Van Wie and Elizabeth Middaugh.
Research:

A census search for Louis locates him in the family of Lewis E. Cook, age 46  of Jackson township, Tioga Co.PA in 1850.  He is an infant listed as Edwin.  This makes sense; he is named for the father, Lewis E. Cook.  His mother's name is Phoebe. 

Another search found the "Reminiscences of a Showman",  A series of weekly articles written by Louis E. Cooke where he tells about his life and experiences with the Wild West Show.  In his June 3 article he tells that he was born in Jackson, Tioga Co. PA and that the family moved to Michigan when he was 6 years old in 1857.  While he doesn't mention his parents by name he states that his mother died 2 years after the move to the wilderness of Michigan.  (These articles are very interesting to read!)


A Find A Grave search turned up Lewis E. Cook, aged 66 years, 7 months, 29 days,  buried in Mendon, St. Joseph County, Michigan. He died November 22, 1870. This must be his father.  I have not located a death record for Phoebe yet.

The New Jersey Historical Society, has a Scrapbook  that shows Cooke, Louis E. (1850-1923), circus agent, hotel proprietor, Newark, N.J.  The scrapbook contains many pictures, etc. of the circus and Louis'  contacts while reporting with the circus. Definitely,  our Louis E. Cooke was a man who traveled world wide working with the circus and the Wild West Show.

Now a look into my genealogy software program for Lewis E. Cook (the father) and what do you know!  There he is.  My records show that he is married to Phoebe Van Wey, a sister of my great, great grandmother Harriet who married Frederick Hughes!  Aha! We have the connection;  Louis E. Cooke was a cousin to Simeon Hughes, my great grandfather.  Their mothers were sisters, daughters of Henry VanWey and Elizabeth Middaugh!

Conclusion:
This picture above, therefore, must be the homestead of Henry Van Wey and his wife Elizabeth Middaugh. 

Do any of my siblings or Hughes cousins remember Grandpa Hughes mentioning that he was a cousin to the famous Buffalo Bill Cody of the Wild West Shows?  

Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World - Circus poster showing cowboys rounding up cattle and portrait of Col. W.F. Cody on horseback. c.1899
When I was a child my family took many camping trips across the country.  When we were in Cody, Wyoming, Dad told us that we were related to Buffalo Bill Cody, but he didn't know how the relationship went.  I have tried several times to find that connection.  What kid of the 50's wouldn't want to discover a famous cowboy was a relative? Not so.  Buffalo Bill Cody has no relationship to the Hughes family.

Here is my theory.  The stories  of cousin Louis Cooke must have been pretty exciting tales when my grandfather was growing up.  I  imagine good old cousin Louis returned to Tioga,  Pennsylvania to visit his family there and shared some of his adventures with the Wild West Show.  It is likely that Grampa Hughes  remembered  hearing these stories about Buffalo Bill and the Wild West Show and by the time we kids were growing up the reminiscences had evolved into  thinking that it was Buffalo Bill who was Grampa Sim's cousin.  We have Louis Cooke, the adventurer and circus agent, friend of Bill Cody, but not his cousin.  Well, that's OK, because this was a fascinating piece of research to work on and I am happy to have not only discovered the truth here,  but also am able to identify  the  homestead in the drawing Louis made. 


Sources:
  • "United States Census, 1850," index and images, FamilySearch, NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 830.
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 13854154, Lewis E. Cooke.
  • The New Jersey Historical Society,  Scrapbook, 1882- 1923. 1 vol.  Online at http://www.jerseyhistory.org/findingaid.php?aid=0975
  • Circus Historical Society, "Reminiscences of a Showman", http://www.circushistory.org/Cooke/Cooke.htm. A series of weekly articles Louis E. Cooke wrote that were published in the Newark Evening Star, Newark, New Jersey, from 1915 to 1916.
  • "Wild West Show",  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_West_shows. 
  • Family records of Cynthia Hughes Smith.

                                                Copyright
                                         This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith
 
                                         Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.

GENEALOGY IS A WORK OF HEART
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. It is with pleasure that I am able to present this information here for you to enjoy. If you discover a relationship here, I would very much enjoy hearing from you.
                                                   Email to chsmith47@yahoo.com               







Friday, October 23, 2015

Jeptha Hughes (1791-1866), Pioneer to Tioga, Co. Pennsylvania




Jeptha Hughes was a fine looking man with a full head of hair!  But, besides that,  his story is the ancestor that every kid who ever came to a Hughes Reunion in Tioga knew.  The Hughes family is proud to be descended from Jeptha. For generations Hughes boys have carried his name.  The idea that he was the man who came into the area and claimed or bought up the land that my grandfather was so proud to point out to me as we stood on a hill top and say, "as far as you can see" was Hughes land. He was born in 1791 at Danville,   Pennsylvania,   the son of Thomas and Mary Stevens Hughes.  His father, who died when Jep was still a minor in 1807,  was a pioneer to the area of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania at Catawissa, near where the East Branch of the Susquehanna River joins the West Branch.   By the time Jep was 18,  his father's estate was settled in court, after which he and his brothers Isaac, Jesse and Jonathon moved further north to the area of present day Hughesville,  Pennsylvania.   In the History of Tioga Co. Pennsylvania it is noted that Jeptha purchased a track of land in Lycoming Co. on March 26, 1816 when he was only 25 years old from John Harrold and laid out the village of Hughesville.   Jeptha Hughes was a man of vision!

Four years later, in July, 1820, he sold his interests and eventually migrated to Tioga, Co. where he was a farmer. He located first in a place called Beecher's Island where he stayed until April 12, 1838, after which he settled at Mitchell's Creek where he remained the rest of his life.  Daisy Miller Hughes gives this account.  "Jeptha set out on foot with his father's brother George (who may have been his cousin) to seek a new territory. They came to a small village on a mountain called Blossburg. They learned of the coal available there and continued to travel until they came to a deep valley called Beecher's Island, and found shelter with a family who told them it was a dwelling place for Indians who called the river Cowanesque, and at the upper end a settlement called Nelson. A winding river and road along the mountain side led north to a village called Painted Post. This section was traveled by paths made by Indians. Jeptha liked what he saw of this land and soon bought a portion and sent for his wife and family. They settled and soon a small community was formed at a place called Beaman, and later Tioga Junction, when the Erie Railroad was built in 1863 from Elmira to the coal mines in Blossburg."


Jeptha was married to Elizabeth Hill, a daughter of Frederick Hill of Lock Haven, in 1816. She was born in 1796. Also known as Betsy, Elizabeth died March 17,1881 when she was 85 years old. They were the parents of six daughters and two sons. Three were born by the time they migrated to Tioga;  Rachael, who married Charles Button, Sarah, who married James Dewey, and Frederick, the only son to marry and carry on the Hughes name. Polly who married John Van Wey, Elizabeth who married Charles Gray, Rebecca, who married David Cunningham, and Catherine and George, neither of whom ever married, were all born in Tioga County.

Jeptha Hughes is recorded on the 1820 census in Lycoming Co., Muncy township, this being prior to his relocating in Tioga county.   On the 1830 census the family is found in Tioga Co., Elkland township.  The 1850 census record locates him in Tioga Co., Lawrence township at which time Elizabeth, Rebecca, George and Catherine are still living at home.  Jeptha is listed as having a property value of $200.00. His neighbor is son, Frederick, whose property value is listed as $1500.00. Another neighbor is John Hughes, age 25, perhaps a nephew.   Jeptha acquired much land in his life time and was able to leave large estates to his children, especially his son Frederick.

Jeptha lived to be 75 years old. This abstract from the Tioga County Agitator records his death. "1866, 7 FEB.   Hughs, Jeptha   died in Tioga, Jan 12, 1866, Jeptha Hughs (Hughes) aged 75 years. He has long  been a resident of Tioga township and leaves a large circle of relatives."  Betsy died  on March 17, 1881 at Mitchel's Creek, Tioga twp. Pennsylvania. She was 85 years old.  They are buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Tioga, Pennsylvania. 



Jeptha and Elizabeth Hill Hughes were  my 3rd great grandparents.  Their son Frederick,  was named to honor  his grandfather Frederick Hill.   Frederick married Harriet Van Why and had a son named Simeon who married Fannie Westlake.  Their son Richard was my grandfather.
Sources:
1897 Tioga County History, Biographical sketches, Jeptha and Frederick Hughes,  History of Tioga Co. PA, Vol. II, p. 1013, 1897.   http://www.rootsweb.com/~srgp/1897/ch63.htm.
Northumberland Co. Court House, Sunbury Pennsylvania, Will Book 2 , p. 55. 
Miller, Daisy Hughes (1900-1989), Beginning of the Hughes' Family in America. June, 1983. Copy in my files.
"United States Census, 1820," FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org.)  
"United States Census, 1840," FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org.) 
"United States Census, 1850," FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org.) 
"United States Census, 1860," FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org.)                                                                            
                                            Copyright
                                         This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith


Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.

GENEALOGY IS A WORK OF HEART
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. It is with pleasure that I am able to present this information here for you to enjoy. If you discover a relationship here, I would very much enjoy hearing from you.


Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Frederick Hill (1758 - 1833)

The story of Frederick Hill has not been an easy one to reconstruct.  The family records kept by  Phoebe Hughes Button names him as the father of Elizabeth Hill Hughes who married Jeptha Hughes.  From Historical Sketches 
of the Bench and Bar of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania it is learned that  "Frederick Hill, born Sept. 8,. 1758, at a place called Windsor Castle, in Windsor Township, Berks County. He lived in Richmond Township, and later Oley Township, where he was a shoemaker. According to his pension affidavit, made May 6, 1818, Frederick enlisted in Berks County, 1777, in Capt. Robert Connelly’s, Company in the Regiment commanded by Col. William Butler, and served for three years in the 4th regiment of the Continental Line.

He served in the battles of Monmouth, New Jersey and Jamestown, Virginia, and was discharged in Virginia. This latter fact would seem to preclude his having participated in the revolt of the Pennsylvania Line, in New Jersey in 1779. At the time of his declaration, he stated that he had no family but resided with his son, aged 21 years.         

                                                                           
The March to Valley Forge by William B. T. Trego (1858-1909)
He was present during that memorable winter at Valley Forge when the troops suffered so much hardship. He died May 6, 1833 according to a notation on his pension declaration papers, and is buried at Danville, Pa."



Frederick married Betsy Myers  sometime around 1790.  She is said to have been born in Loch Haven, Pennsylvania.  It is not known exactly when she died,  but it was about 1801.  They had three children;  Catherine who was born in 1792 and married Isaac Hughes,  Elizabeth, born 1796 who married Jeptha Hughes (the Hill sisters married Hughes brothers) and  Martin,  the unnamed son with whom Frederick was living in 1818 when he made his declaration for pension, was born August 1, 1800.  It is believed that Betsy died shortly after the birth of Martin.

The DAR has  a file for Frederick Hill.  He is Ancestor #: A055716.  It is interesting to note that a second wife is named here, Mary Elizabeth Dockerty.  Some resources name additional children,  Jacob, Mary who married John Hampton and Rebecca who married Joseph Cole who are probably the children of this second marriage.

Daughter Elizabeth married Jeptha Hughes and had a son named Frederick who must have been named after his grandfather Frederick Hill.  Frederick Hughes married Harriet Van Why and had a son named Simeon who married Fannie Westlake.  Their son Richard was my grandfather.

The pension records say he is buried in Danville.  If anyone has found the gravesite I would like to know where it is. 

Sources:
  • Family records of Cynthia Hughes Smith taken from the Hughes Family reunion records kept by Phoebe Hughes Button (1891-1976) of Tioga co. Pa.
  • http://www.lycolaw.org/history/sketches/10.htm, Historical Sketches 
of the Bench and Bar of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania.

                       Please see this list of all My Revolutionary War Ancestors.

                                                     Copyright
                                         This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith

Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.

GENEALOGY IS A WORK OF HEART
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. It is with pleasure that I am able to present this information here for you to enjoy. If you discover a relationship here, I would very much enjoy hearing from you.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Frederick Hughes (1820 - 1906)




The obituary notice of Frederick Hughes was published on the front page of the newspaper accompanied by a two column photograph of him.  It states...

"The venerable and widely known subject of this sketch was one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of Tioga County. He was born in Hughesville, Lycoming Co., Nov. 13, 1820 and died at his home at Mitchels Creek, April 25th, 1906. He was the oldest son of Jeptha and Betsy Hughes who came from a thrifty Pennsylvania German stock .

When four years of age Mr. Hughes came to this county with his parents and settled in the Covenesque valley near the present village of Nelson. About 1840 he walked from Laweranceville to Covington and there at the Bingham office, took up 60 acres of land at Mitchels Creek. From this he kept branching out until at the time of his death he and his children owned, in that vicinity about four square miles of the best farming lands of this county.

On June 16, 1846 he was married to Harriet VanWey who died about a year ago. Twelve children were born to them, nine of whom are still living. George, Frank, Charles, Simeon, John, Will, and Betty Meeker - all live near Mitchels Creek; Fred of Denver, Col., and Mrs. Phoebe Gaige, of Mansfield, Pa. Benjamin, Henrietta, Harriet are not living. There are also forty -six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Mr. Hughes left his parental roof when a mere boy with a determination to make his own way in life. He was always a hard working man and success crowned his every effort. He was keen and shrewd in business, but honorable and upright in every transaction. He was a devoted husband and a loving father whose wise counsel will be greatly missed by his children, who although well advanced in middle life, always looked to him for advice.

There is a vacancy in the old homestead that will be felt more keenly as the months roll on. But there are fond remembrances of such men and hope of a future reunion. The funeral was very largely attended at his home Friday afternoon."

He married Harriet Van Wey in Tioga, Pennsylvania. Harriet was born October 18, 1822 and died September 17, 1904 in Tioga.  At the time of her death, in addition to her twelve children, she was also a grandmother of   forty-six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.  
A note from her obituary states, "She was born on the spot where the Tioga Junction depot now stands, a mile and a half from where she died."

She was the daughter of Henry Van Wey and his wife Elizabeth Middaugh. The Van Weys and the family of Elias Middaugh, her grandfather were of Holland Dutch descent. Information found in the article "Chief Settlers between 1820 and 1830", located in  the book, Tioga Township and Borough, by Henry H. Goodrich mentions Henry Van Wey as one of the earliest settlers in the area.  "Dr. Pliny Power came and settled for a time with his brother Dr. Simeon Power, both of whom were early settlers in Lawrence Township; ... Following him in the order of settlement at Tioga, as near as can now be stated, were Henry Van Wey, lumberman and farmer..."

Harriet's brother, John Van Wey, married Polly Hughes, sister of Frederick Hughes. These two families and Jeptha Hughes are neighbors on the 1850 census in Lawrence twp., Tioga Co.   For many years, her granddaughter Phoebe Hughes Button was the family historian.  Phoebe's  notes in the record book of the Hughes Reunion states that Harriet's  father's name was Henry Van Wey  and that  her mother's was Betsy. 
Frederick and Harriet  are both buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Tioga Pennsylvania.  Three generations of the Hughes family are buried here.   Their gravestone is in the same location as that of Frederick's father and mother, Jeptha and Betsy Hughes, and Frederick's son, Simeon. 
The descendants of Frederick and Harriet Hughes continued to hold summer time family reunions at the Hammond Dam Park in Tioga, Pennsylvania for over 75 years.  Descendants of the  Hughes family live  in many places throughout the United States, however  there are many Hughes descendants still living in the Tioga area.  Frederick and Harriet Hughes were my great, great grandparents.

Sources:
Newspaper obituary,  "The Late Frederick Hughes",  The Argus, Tioga, Friday, May 4, 1906. With photo.
Find A Grave Memorial # 71301870  and  #71301998
Federal Census records
Family records of Cynthia Hughes Smith.

                                                             Copyright

This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith

Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.


GENEALOGY IS A WORK OF HEART
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. It is with pleasure that I am able to present this information here for you to see. If you discover a relationship here, I would very much enjoy hearing from you.

Elias Middaugh (1756- 1819)

The grave of Elias Middaugh in the Dutchtown Cemetery, Wellsburg, Chemung County, New York is marked with a new monument and flag to honor our Revolutionary Patriot.

His will was probated on the 20th of  November, 1819.  His wife was not named, but the names of his children were given as Phebe, James, Elizabeth, Catherine, Abraham, Urania, Cornelius, Anthony, Mary, Charity, John, and Henry.  The executors for the will were Henry Wells, Esq., and son in law, Isaac Beidleman.

His father was Cornelius Middaugh and his mother, Elizabeth Van Benschoten,  both of Holland Dutch ancestry whose roots were in the Dutch Colony in Ulster Co., New York.   William Henry Van Benschoten  in his book about the Van Benschoten family in 1907  sites that our Elias Middagh married Sarah Van Aken.  The baptisms of three of their children appear in the church record at Mahackemack, now Port Jervis, New York.  One being Elizabeth who was christened on  October 29, 1780.  Elias Middaugh's name appears in the 1772 and 1778 Tax & Exoneration lists in Smithfield Township, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania.  It was during this time that Elias Middaugh provided service in the American Revolution.  The DAR list him as Ancestor #: A202512 and show his record in 1778 as a private 4th class of the 1st Company under Captain Anthony Shymer in the 6th Battalion of the Northampton Co. Militia commanded by Col. Jacob Stroud.  Military records also are found for 1777 and 1781 with the Northampton Co. Militia.

He is still in  Upper Smithfield Twp when he is enumerated in  the 1790 Census, sometime after which he moved on to Newtown, now Elmira, N.Y.  With the end of the Revolutionary War, soldiers began to move westward into territory that was still pretty rugged and on the edge of the frontier.

Van Benschoten provides this very interesting account of Elias' half brother, John Van Auken.  "In 1796 John, following the lead two years earlier of his brother in-law, Ludowick Van Demark, emigrated to Phelps, N.Y., brave Margaret carrying in her arms a son three months old. The hardships of the journey were great, what with three small children, household goods and cattle and the wild state of the country traversed. They made the journey with a covered lumber wagon and two yoke of oxen.  Four cows and ten head of sheep journeyed with them driven by one Richard Quick.  As they neared the Susquehanna  and were passing over a ledge of rocks they broke an axle-tree and this had to be replaced. The fording of the streams added greatly to their difficulties, in particular the passing of the Chenango river.  After grievous trouble they made the crossing of that water and came to  Newtown (Elmira) where Gen. Sullivan had fought one of his battles with the Six Nations.   Here Elias Middagh, a half-brother of John, had settled.   With him they rested a few days and then took up the struggle through the wilds again; indeed, wilderness trials beset them until  the head of Seneca Lake was reached."
 

From this account we know that Elias was in the Elmira, New York area before 1796.  I can only imagine that Elias and his family had just as arduous a trip traveling from Upper Smithfield Township in Northampton County, Pennsylvania to Chemung Township in Tioga County, New York as did his brother John.   Elias Middaugh  appears on the 1799 Tax Assessment, Town of Chemung, Tioga County,  New York; House & Farm, 626.85, 154.00, 0.78.   The 1800 Census for Chemung Twp, Tioga County, New York shows us the growth of his family whereby there are listed 2 males 0-9, 3 males 10-15, 1 male 16-25, 1 male 45 or older  and  3 females 0-9, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 16-25 and 1 female 26-44 in his household.  The 1810 Census  Chemung Twp, Tioga County, New York shows 1 male 10-15, 3 males 16025, 1 male over 45, 1 female 10/15, 1 female 16-25, 1 female over 45.  

And now the family connection.   Remember Orrseltie Ursula Dircks Hendricksen Jacobs Westbrook?   She  was the  mother of Johannes Westbrook (1662-1725)  who married Maddelen Decker (1666-1727).  They were the parents of Sarah Westbrook (1694-1766) who married Cornelis Van Aken (1690-1743), who had a son Abraham (born 1720), who married Catrina Rosenkrans (born 1728).    Their daughter is the Sarah Van Aken (1757-1819)  who married Elias Middaugh (1756-1819).    And their daughter, Elizabeth Middaugh (1780-1848),  married Henry Van Wey (1776-1836) in Tioga Co. Pennsylvania.  Henry's daughter, Harriet Van Wey, my  great, great grandmother, married Frederick Hughes.

Sources:
Abstracts of Wills for residents who resided in that portion of Tioga County, New York that became Chemung County located at http://www.rootsweb.com/~srgp/document/tiogany.htm.
"Van Bunschoten or Van Benschoten Family in America"  by William Henry Van Benschoten published 1907,  located online, July 23, 2003 at http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ny/county/orange/vb/id51.htm.
Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Volume 8, pages  410, 426, 427, 428.  Available on line.
Daughters of the American Revolution, http://www.dar.org/
Find A Grave Memorial # 77803677, Elias Middaugh, online.

Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission; Records of the Office of the Comptroller General, RG-4; Tax & Exoneration Lists, 1762-1794; Microfilm Roll: 331.  Ancestry.com.
Family records of Cynthia Hughes Smith.


Please see this list of all My Revolutionary War Ancestors.   I welcome your comments. Please consider joining this BLOG as a follower or  a member.                                                                Copyright
                                       This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith


This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.
                                
                              Send email  to chsmith47@yahoo.com





  





Friday, September 4, 2015

Deabold Schott (1735 - 1799)

The Smith family has a rich heritage of ancestors descended from men who provided service  to the United States of America so that we may enjoy the freedoms of liberty.  In this entry I will provide some links to show several of our connections back to Deabold Schott.  About 1760 Deabold  Schott married Christina Elisabetha Ries. They became the parents of 11 children whose names are provided in the DAR papers. They were: Lorentz Feb 13, 1761;  Maria Margaretha 7/17 1763;  Gertrude 3/3/1765;  Christina 1/3/1767 who married Leonard Knecht the son of Hans Leonard Knecht;  Dewald (Theobald) 1769; John Jacob 7/25/1770; Margaretha 7/3/1772;  Catharina 7/21/1774; Elizabetha 11/28/1776 and  Anna Maria 12/4/1777.

The inscriptions on the tombstones of Deabold and Christina in the  Salem Union Church Cemetery, Moorestown, Pennsylvania provides important information for both.  He was born on September 28, 1735 and died November 14, 1799.   Christina Riesen Schott was born June 24, 1737 and lived to the age of 69 when she died on November 22, 1806.    Her stone is difficult to read, but the inscription in part says, "lived in marriage with Theobald Schott for 39 years and conceived 4 sons and  7 daughters".   The "en" attached to Ries tells us that she was a daughter of a man named Ries.





















A flag and medal at his grave commemorates military service, but it is not always easy to prove that an ancestor  provided service during the Revolutionary War.  For one thing any documents that remain showing a record of service have been transcribed from the original records.  Have you ever tried to read something written in  a 250 year old script?  The handwriting, while in some cases is beautiful and flowing, in many it is just downright near impossible to decipher.  But the transcriber did the best they could when they read the records to write the names in modern English. And for the amateur genealogist such as me, the best sources are these transcribed records, many of which can be now found on line.

Deabold lived in Northampton Co., Pennsylvania  prior to and after the Revolutionary War.  Even though there is a Dewalt Schudt who arrived here on the ship Ranier in 1749, our Deabold would have  only been 14 years old in 1749, so most likely this is his father.  A record from Macungie township shows that  Dewalt Shut or Shutt (both spelling used in this) applied for 50 acres adjoining Joseph Walbretght, Christian Curr and Caspar Wistar in 1758. By this time he would have been about 23 years old and ready to start out on his own.  On May 25, 1758, Dewalt Shut  applied for  25 acres including improvements made about a year ago adjoining lands of Joseph Albright in Macungie township.  


Deabold's  name appears in a general muster roll of the 2nd Battalion of the Northampton County Pennsylvania Militia, May 14, 1778.  (Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Volume 8, page 106) The troops were commanded by  Colonel George Breinig, Lieut. Colonel Stephen Balliet, and 2nd Company Captain George Knappenberger.  Dewauld Shoutt was in the 6th class. The Daughters of the American Revolution  provides us with a record of his service in the Revolutionary War.  He is Ancestor #:  A101118.  The DAR record cites his service listed in the Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Volume 8, page 106.  the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Company, Northampton Co. under Captain Johan George Knappenberger.  Another Smith ancestor,  George Graver was also part of this company.


A later service record shows that he provided a substitute, Lorance Shott, in his stead  (PA Archives, Series 5, Volume 8, page 47 and 60).  The 1st Battalion of the Northampton Co. Militia was  commanded by Lieut. Colonel Stephen Balliet and Captain Casper Griemimyer in the 7th Company. Theobald Shoth (also shown as Devalt Shot)  was in the 6th class for which his son, Lawrence served in his place. 

Deabold and Christina had a daughter Christina who married Leonard Knecht who was the son of Hans Leonard Knecht.    Christina Schott and  Leonard Knecht had a daughter named Salome who married George Kunkle, a grandson of John George Kunkle.  Their son  Charles Kunkle was the grandfather of Estella Kunkle who was the great grandmother of Ronald Smith, my husband. 

Sources:
Bucks Co. PA Gen Web."Land Records For Bucks County Pennsylvania". http://pagenweb.org/~BUCKS/Land20Records/landrecordspage2.html
Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Volume 8, various pages as cited above.  Available on line.
Find A Grave Memorial # 59644709 and  # 59644751
Family records of Cynthia Hughes Smith

Please see this list of all My Revolutionary War Ancestors.  I welcome your comments. Please consider joining this BLOG as a follower or member.

                                                             Copyright

This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith

Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.

Monday, August 3, 2015

George Graver (1742 - 1807)

This very awesome tintype is a picture of several members of the Edward Graver family who lived in Franklin township, Carbon County, Pennsylvania.  Ed and his wife Elizabeth are seated.  Wilson Graver, the father of Beatrice Graver Smith, stands in the middle back flanked by his sister and brother.   Wilson married Jennie Lauer. You must go back and read the story of their very rocky relationship, but before you do, I will share with you what I have learned about Wilson's great, great grandfather, George Graver.

George (Graber ) Graver is the earliest known ancestor of Beatrice Graver Smith. Beatrice was my husband Ron's grandmother.   In her written family history, she wrote that oral family history told to her was that this branch of the family was from Switzerland. They were probably members of the Palatine people who immigrated to America from the Rhine river area of Germany / Switzerland.  George married Maria Catherine Ludwig.

The Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952  shows that George Graber had a  Warrant dated 20 August 1768 for 50 acres in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. That is a substantial tract of land. Between then and 1807 when he died he acquired more land as evidenced in his will.  His will was filed and proven on February 26, 1807 in Moore Township, Northampton County Pennsylvania. File #2506, Will Book 4 names sons John and Mathias as executors and  also names his eleven children. To son Henry his homestead of 66.5 acres, while son David received 50 pounds. To his daughter Elizabeth (Moser) was given the yearly interest on 100 pounds,  the principle to be retained for her. To his sons George, Mathias, Peter, Andrew, Henry and Daniel each received 30 pounds.  John and Mathias, the executors, received 25 pounds.  

As to the records documenting Revolutionary War service for George Graver the following evidence has been found.

The Archives Records Informational System says that "Inactive Duty" meant the soldier did not necessarily see active duty.  The Pennsylvania Militia was organized under an Act of the Assembly of March 17, 1777 that required compulsory enrollment of all able-bodied white males between the ages of 18 and 53.

But his name appears in a general muster roll of the 2nd Battalion of the Northampton County Pennsylvania Militia, May 14, 1778.  The troops were commanded by  Colonel George Breinig, Lieut. Colonel Stephen Balliet, and 2nd Company Captain George Knappenberger.  George Graver was in the 2nd class.
The Daughters of the American Revolution  provides us with a record of his service in the Revolutionary War.  He is Ancestor #: A133784.  The DAR record gives him credit in the 1st Battalion of the Northampton County Pennsylvania Militia in the 2nd Company under Lieut. Colonel Stephen Balliet, Major Frederick Limbach and Captain Grienlmyer.  Dates of service for this enlistment were November, 1781 to January 1st 1782.  He is listed as a private.
Therefore we can surmise that he willingly availed himself for service for the duration of the War for Independence.  Living in  this part of Northampton County meant not only being prepared to go into battle if called upon, but also meant securing the safety of the home-front from invasion by hostiles, as this area was very much the frontier at that time.
Life was not easy for a family living on the frontier.  George's son Daniel married Elizabeth Dreisbach, whose father Johannes Dreisbach also gave service in the Revolutionary War.  Dan and Elizabeth Graver had a son named John Andrew who married Elizabeth Hower and had a son named Edward who is  pictured in the above photo.

Sources:


1. Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Volume 8, page 106, page 59.
2. National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, online research, http://services.dar.org/public/dar_research/search/
3. Pennsylvania State Archives, online http://www.digitalarchives.state.pa.us/archive.asp. (ARIAS).

  This entry marks the 3rd year anniversary of the publication of my Family History Blog, "Who's Your Grammie".  Your comments are welcome on the form below.  Please see this list of all My Revolutionary War Ancestors.


                                                               Copyright

This page  © 2015, Cynthia H. Smith

Send email to chsmith47@yahoo.com
This site may be linked, but not duplicated in any way without consent. The copyright on this page must appear on all copied and/or printed material.